Noam Chomsky, Vijay Prashad – Why Neoliberal Leaders Who Failed to Protect Their Countries From COVID-19 Must Be Investigated

This article is somewhat short sighted. Many governments put business blatantly before their citizens’ health, relaxing controls and creating the second COVID wave. Nations is Asia that did so well in the first wave have not experienced a second wave because they continued their vigilance – at a high cost for their economies, especially tourism.

Noam Chomsky is a legendary linguist, philosopher, and political activist. He is the laureate professor of linguistics at the University of Arizona. His most recent book is Climate Crisis and the Global Green New Deal: The Political Economy of Saving the Planet.

Vijay Prashad is an Indian historian, editor and journalist. He is a writing fellow and chief correspondent at Globetrotter. He is the chief editor of LeftWord Books and the director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research. He is a senior non-resident fellow at Chongyang Institute for Financial Studies, Renmin University of China.

This article was produced by Globetrotter

Warnings that the oxygen supply was running out in the city of Manaus, Brazil, came to local and federal government officials a week before the calamity led to the deaths by asphyxiation of patients afflicted with COVID-19. No modern state—such as Brazil—should have to admit that it did nothing when these warnings came in and simply allowed its own citizens to die for no reason.

A Supreme Court judge and the solicitor general have demanded that the Brazilian government act, but this has not moved Jair Bolsonaro’s administration. Everything about this story—detailed in Solicitor General José Levi do Amaral’s report—reveals the rot of privatization and incompetence. The local health officials knew in early January that there was going to be an oxygen shortage imminently, but their warning did not carry any weight. A private contractor who had the job of providing the oxygen informed the government six days before the city ran out of this crucial supply in the fight against COVID-19. Even with the contractor’s information, the government did nothing; it would later say—against all scientific advice—that early treatment for coronavirus did not work. The insensitivity and incompetence of the government of Bolsonaro have led General Prosecutor Augusto Aras to call for a special probe. As Bolsonaro dithered, the government of Venezuela, in an act of solidarity, sent a shipment of oxygen to Manaus.

The latest development caused by the government’s toxic mix of privatization, ineptitude, and callousness should strengthen the case brought by Brazil’s health care unions against Jair Bolsonaro at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in July. But the problem is not the fault of Bolsonaro alone or even of Brazil. The problem lies in the neoliberal governments, governments in the United States, the United Kingdom, India, and others, governments whose commitments to profit-making firms and billionaires far outstrip their commitment to their own citizens or to their own constitutions. What we are seeing in countries such as Brazil is a crime against humanity.

It is time to impanel a citizens’ tribunal to investigate the utter failure of the governments of Boris Johnson, Donald Trump, Jair Bolsonaro, Narendra Modi, and others to break the chain of the infection of COVID-19. Such a tribunal would collect the factual information that would ensure that we do not allow these states to tamper with the crime scene; the tribunal would provide the ICC with a firm foundation to do a forensic investigation of this crime against humanity when its own political suffocation is eased.

We should all be outraged. But, outrage is not a strong enough word.

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1 Comment

  1. In my own article on the european response to Covid a few days ago I drew attention to Audrey Lebret in “COVID-19 pandemic and derogation to human rights”. In her conclusions Lebret predicts a future flood of cases for Human Rights courts, and asserts “this crisis shows the fragility of health systems, urging governments to review their strategies and to (re)invest massively in the healthcare sector”.
    In both the UK and France there is no sign that there is any such review or a wish to reverse a trend toward imitating “lean” industrial strategies. Instead all planned investment is in more rationalisation designed to extract more from less.
    At the same time there are reports of further pressure to empty capacity in hospitals by discharging patients into nursing homes, despite the covid risks.
    Local Authority scrutiny panels and local politicians need to be vigilant.
    There are those that see the current crisis as an opportunity for “transformation” and “integration” into a sub-contracted future for healthcare delivery supervised by “accountable care” organisations.

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